June 25, 2015

Phnom Penh, Cambodia


What Lonely Planet said: Phnom Penh: the name can’t help but conjure up an image of the exotic. The glimmering spires of the Royal Palace, the fluttering saffron of the monks’ robes and the luscious location on the banks of the mighty Mekong this is the Asia many dreamed of when first imagining their adventures overseas

I was there: August 29 - 30, 2011

Camera used: Canon EOS 40D

June 18, 2015

Imperial Tombs, Hue, Vietnam



What Lonely Planet said: Palaces and pagodas, tombs and temples, culture and cuisine, history and heartbreak – there’s no shortage of poetic pairings to describe Hue (pronounced ‘hway’). A Unesco World Heritage site, this deeply evocative capital of the Nguyen emperors still resonates with the glories of imperial Vietnam, even though many of its finest buildings were destroyed during the American War.

I was there: June 8, 2012 - June 9, 2012

Camera used: Canon EOS 40D

June 11, 2015

Qingdao, Shandong, China


What Lonely Planet said: Offering a breath of fresh (ocean) air, Qingdao is a rare modern city that has managed to preserve some of its past. Its blend of concession-era and modern architecture puts China’s standard white-tile and blue-glass developments to shame. The winding cobbled streets and red-capped hillside villas are captivating. There is also plenty to enjoy in the city’s diverse food scene, headlined by the ubiquitous hometown beer Tsingtao.

I was there: June 26 - 27, 2013

Camera used: Canon EOS 40D, Samsung Galaxy Note

June 4, 2015

Langkawi, Kedah, Malaysia


What Lonely Planet said: Langkawi is synonymous with ‘tropical paradise’ – and with good reason. Since 2008 the archipelago’s official title has been Langkawi Permata Kedah (Langkawi, the Jewel of Kedah), no doubt inspired by the island’s clear waters, relatively pristine beaches and intact jungle.

I was there: August 10 - 12, 2013

Camera used: Canon EOS 40D, Samsung Galaxy Note

May 28, 2015

Manila, Philippines



What Lonely Planet said: Manila’s moniker, the ‘Pearl of the Orient’, couldn't be more apt – its cantankerous shell reveals its jewel only to those resolute enough to pry. No stranger to hardship, the city has endured every disaster both human and nature could throw at it, and yet today the chaotic metropolis thrives as a true Asian megacity.

I was there: March 21, 2014

Camera used: Nexus 5


May 21, 2015

Suzhou, Jiangsu, China


What Lonely Planet said: Historically, Suzhou was synonymous with high culture and elegance, and generations of artists, scholars, writers and high society in China were drawn by its exquisite art forms and the delicate beauty of its gardens.

I was there: March 27 - March 29, 2015

Camera used: Google Nexus 5

May 14, 2015

Guilin, Guangxi, China



What Lonely Planet said: Guìlín was China's first city to develop tourism after 1949. For decades, children's textbooks proclaimed 'Guìlín's landscape is the best under heaven'. It was the darling of Chinese politicians, the star city proudly presented to visiting dignitaries. Today Guìlín's natural endowments still amaze, yet, thanks to imperfect urban planning, there is a pervasive feeling that the city is past its prime.

I was there: January 10, 2013, January 12, 2013 - January 13, 2013

Camera used: Canon EOS 40D

May 7, 2015

Jiufen, Taipei County, Taiwan


What Lonely Planet said: Nestled against the mountains and hemmed in by the sea is the villages of Jiufen, one of the quaintest stops along the northeast coast. The village was a mining centre during the Japanese era and by the 1930s, Jiufen was so prosperous it was known as 'Little Shanghai'

I was there: September 22, 2010

Camera used: Canon EOS 40D

April 30, 2015

Angkor temples, Siem Reap, Cambodia



What Lonely Planet said: Welcome to heaven on earth. Angkor is the earthly representation of Mt Meru, the Mt Olympus of the Hindu faith and the abode of ancient gods. The temples are the perfect fusion of creative ambition and spiritual devotion. The Cambodian ‘god-kings’ of old each strove to better their ancestors in size, scale and symmetry, culminating in the world’s largest religious building, Angkor Wat.

I was there: August 28, 2011

Camera used: Canon EOS 40D

April 23, 2015

Bali, Indonesia (Part 2)


What Lonely Planet said: The mere mention of Bali evokes thoughts of a paradise. It's more than a place; it's a mood, an aspiration, a tropical state of mind.

I was there: August 13, 2012 - August 15, 2012

Camera used: Canon EOS 40D


April 16, 2015

Bali, Indonesia (Part 1)



What Lonely Planet said: The mere mention of Bali evokes thoughts of a paradise. It's more than a place; it's a mood, an aspiration, a tropical state of mind.

I was there: August 13, 2012 - August 15, 2012

Camera used: Canon EOS 40D


April 9, 2015

Puerto Princesa, Palawan, The Philippines


What Lonely Planet said: The capital of Palawan is more than simply the jumping-off point for excursions elsewhere on the island. ‘Puerto’, as locals call it, has a thriving restaurant scene, and day trips abound, offering everything from island-hopping to remote beaches to drives through stunning countryside. However, though cleaner than other Filipino cities, owing to an admirable and strictly enforced no-littering law, it’s no tropical paradise. Despite the fact that it’s hyped as the ecocapital of the country, tricycle traffic jams and concrete buildings abound.

I was there: March 18, 2014 - March 19, 2014

Camera used: LG Nexus 5

April 2, 2015

Singapore


What Lonely Planet said: Ditch the image of Singapore as a dull, sterile Utopia – scratch the surface and you’ll discover a strange brew of Chinese, Malay, Indian and Western cultures, a rich social stew that’s anything but boring. Sure, the graffiti-free trains run on time, traffic jams are nonexistent and everyone looks clean-cut and wholesome, but who needs pollution, poverty and chaos?

I was there: Most recently, March 23, 2011 - March 27, 2011

Camera used: Canon EOS 40D

March 26, 2015

Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia


What Lonely Planet said: A microcosm of Malaysia’s economic explosion: fishing village strikes oil, modernity ensues. Kuala Terengganu is surprisingly attractive despite the number of newly built (with petro-wealth), sterile-looking skyscrapers. There’s a boardwalk, a couple of decent beaches, a few old kampong style houses hidden among the high rises, and one of Eastern Peninsular Malaysia’s prettiest Chinatowns. With seafood-heavy local cuisine and good transport links, KT is worth a day or two in between the islands and jungles.

I was there: August 5, 2013 - August 6, 2013

Cameras used: Canon EOS 40D, Samsung Galaxy Note